Email Marketing Best Practices Pt. 1: Check With Your Service Provider

Email Marketing Services For Albany Businesses | SEO Without Borders

In the 1990s, as companies began to adopt email as a marketing tactic, email service providers sprang up to help with the technical aspects. Many are still in business today, providing a broad range of services.

Email Marketing: Measuring Deliverability Rates

As digital marketing evolved to encompass techniques complementary to email (e.g. landing pages, forms) or dependent on it (e.g. webinars), new technology – primarily marketing automation – evolved to manage email marketing and integrate these new components, and report on the combined results.

Benchmarks

Do you know what your current deliverability rates are? Whether you work with an email marketing service provider in Albany or an automation service provider, they should be able to provide them to you.

Here are the basics to look for:

Email Sent

This is how many messages were in the queue before any delivery attempts were made, but after internal suppression has been performed. For those who subscribe to some “active contacts,” this is the number counted.

This will be a whole number, not a percentage.

Email Delivered

This metric describes how many emails were completely transferred to the intended recipient’s mailbox provider without generating a “bounce” or other delivery error.

There are two levels of delivery:

  • If the recipient’s email provider rejects the email message, it does not count as delivered. However, if the vendor accepts the message, it counts as delivered.
  • Once past the provider’s filters, the email message must still make it past the recipient’s filters. If the addressee has content-based filters set up that prevent the email from reaching the inbox (e.g., being diverted to the junk folder), it generally will count as delivered.
  • This is the metric used to purchase email advertising by CPM or third party list rental. You will see it as a whole number and also as an “Email Delivery Rate” percentage (e.g. “95%”).

Email Inbox Delivered

This metric is an estimation of how many of the Sent emails ended up in the inbox.

You’ll see it as a whole number or as a percentage (e.g. “90%”).

Bounces

Bounces are emails that cannot be delivered to the mailbox provider and are returned to the service provider that sent them.

“Hard” bounces are the failed delivery of an email due to a permanent reason, such as a non-existent address. “Soft” bounces are the failed delivery of an email due to a temporary issue such as a full inbox or an unavailable ISP server. Email unsubscribe requests.

This tallies how many people took action (such as clicking an “unsubscribe me from this list” link) to unsubscribe from a list.

Complaints

This counts how many people clicked a spam or junk button link in their email client to report an email as spam or junk.

Other common email metrics, such as Opens and Click-throughs, are also important, as ISPs look at engagement measures to help determine overall how “wanted” an email is.

Shared Responsibilities

Your marketing automation service provider will manage certain aspects of your list and email campaign, including bounces, unsubscribes, and feedback.Your service provider will also ensure that your email is RFC compliant (this refers to email standards set by the Internet Engineering Task Force) and may manage aspects of your IP. The balance of the activities is the domain of the marketer.

Your service provider will also ensure that your email is RFC compliant (this refers to email standards set by the Internet Engineering Task Force) and may manage aspects of your IP. The balance of the activities is the domain of the marketer.

Email Marketing Best Practices Pt. 1: Check With Your Service Provider

  • The green text indicates activities the marketer controls
  • The orange text shows activities the service provider manages
  • The black text means activities that may be administered by the marketer’s company or the service provider
Julian ConnorsEmail Marketing Best Practices Pt. 1: Check With Your Service Provider